Djingareyber Mosque

Djingareyber Mosque

Said to have been designed by the Granada-born architect Abu Ishaq al-Sahili for the Malian emperor Mansa Musa, the Djingareyber mosque was initially constructed between 1325-1327. Made of round mud bricks and stone rubble with a rendering of banco, the Djingareyber mosque has been modified extensively over the years, including a major reconstruction between 1569 and 1571. Despite its foreign architect, the mosque was built and has been maintained by local masons and reflects local and regional architectural traditions. The prayer hall is essentially a rectangular structure with a flat roof supported by mud-brick arcades, including three horseshoe arches. The mosque's mihrab and adjoining minbar or pulpit is topped by a conical tower. The mosque's minaret (see image to the left), which rises above what may once have been the northwest corner of the prayer hall, has an internal stair that it accessed by a small courtyard on the north end of the compound. A larger courtyard or sahn accesses the prayer hall through its western facade.

Regions and Styles
Timbuktu
Djingareyber Mosque